Look what you made me do! Moment Cop plays Taylor Swift song to try to take advantage of copyright laws and prevent spitting from being posted online with protester

  • California officer tried to take advantage of copyright laws and performed a song by Taylor Swift so her confrontation with a protester could not be downloaded
  • The incident happened outside the Alameda courthouse in Oakland on Tuesday when Sgt. David Shelby asked James Burch to move a banner
  • Burch and Staff Sgt. Shelby discusses the banner as the sergeant pulls out his cell phone and presses play on Taylor Swift’s 2014 hit “Blank Space”
  • Shelby tells Burch and the person who recorded the confrontation “You can record anything you want, I just know it can’t be posted on YouTube”
  • “It’s not a good idea for law enforcement,” a spokesperson for the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office said, adding there was a “serious lesson learned here”
  • Since the images of the confrontation were published, they have garnered 824,000 views on Twitter and 462,000 views on YouTube.

Footage captured the moment a California officer attempted to take advantage of copyright laws by playing a song by Taylor Swift so that his confrontation with a protester could not be uploaded to YouTube.

The incident took place on Tuesday in front of the Alameda Courthouse in Oakland when an officer, identified by the Los Angeles Times as Sgt. David Shelby, asked protester James Burch to move a banner.

Burch, director of policy for the Anti Police-Terror Project (APTP) and several protesters stood on the steps of the Oakland courthouse to listen to a show from the preliminary hearing of Police Officer Jason Fletcher, who was charged with manslaughter in the fatal shooting of Steven Taylor, a black man, at a Walmart last year, the Verge reported.

Burch and Staff Sgt.  Shelby discusses the banner when in the middle of the conversation the sergeant is caught pulling out his cell phone and pressing play on Taylor Swift's 2014 hit

Burch and Staff Sgt. Shelby discusses the banner when in the middle of the conversation the sergeant is caught pulling out his cell phone and pressing play on Taylor Swift’s 2014 hit “Blank Space”

Burch and Staff Sgt. Shelby is discussing the banner when in the middle of the conversation the sergeant is caught pulling out his cell phone and pressing play on Taylor Swift’s 2014 hit “Blank Space”.

As the pop song plays, Burch, confused, asks the officer “Shall we have a dance party now?”

The person recording the confrontation asks Shelby if he’s playing the music to stifle the conversation.

The officer then said to him, “You can record anything you want, I just know it can’t be posted on YouTube.”

Shleby was wrong, the footage remains on YouTube where it garnered 462,000 views and on Twitter, where it has been viewed over 824,000 times.

Shelby appeared to confirm that he is taking advantage of YouTube’s copyright takedown policy, which removes content that contains unauthorized use of music.

As the pop song continues to play, Burch asks Shelby, “Is this a procedure? ”

“I just listen to music, sir,” Shelby replies.

Shelby tells Burch and the person who recorded the confrontation

Shelby tells Burch and the person who recorded the confrontation “You can record anything you want, I just know it can’t be posted on YouTube”

The Alameda County Sheriff’s Office told the Washington Post that the matter has been referred to the office’s internal affairs department and is under investigation.

“The officer was trying to be a little smart, and it kind of backfired on him,” said office spokesperson Sgt. Ray Kelly told the Post. “Instead of censoring it, it made it go viral.”

Kelly added that there is no policy prohibiting an officer from playing copyrighted music while filming, but “there is a code of conduct on how we are to behave in public. “Kelly said.

Kelly told the Post that the The sheriff’s office does not “tolerate” the behavior of the deputy.

“It’s not a good idea for law enforcement,” he said, adding that there was a “serious lesson learned here”.

Burch told the Post he was troubled by Shelby’s attempt to prevent the showdown from downloading.

“Any tactics by law enforcement to try to prevent activists from recording or slowing down our attempts to do so is incredibly worrying,” he told the Post. “After the murder of George Floyd, everyone understands why the organizers and activists are recording our interactions with law enforcement.”





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