Steven Avery’s mother, who appeared in the Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer,” died Thursday morning – just a day before Avery’s 59th birthday.

Avery lawyer Kathleen Zellner confirmed the death of Dolores Avery, 83, in a Tweeter Thursday afternoon.

“Fate dealt Steven Avery another cruel blow today, just before his birthday tomorrow; her mother Dolores Avery passed away at 6:50 am, ”she wrote. “He needs your support more than ever.

Avery is jailed at Waupun Correctional Facility in Wisconsin where he is serving a life sentence for the murder of Teresa Halbach in 2005.

He maintained his innocence and his case featured in Netflix’s “Making a Murder” docuseries, which cast doubt on his conviction.

Dolores featured prominently on the show, according to the Post Crescent, and has always maintained that her son is innocent.

Dolores Avery, right, died Thursday morning of dementia at the age of 86.  She is the mother of Steven Avery, who is serving a life sentence for the murder of a photographer in 2005.

Dolores Avery, right, died Thursday morning of dementia at the age of 86. She is the mother of Steven Avery, who is serving a life sentence for the murder of a photographer in 2005.

A photo of Allan, Dolores and Steven Avery with their friend Sandy Greenman, taken during a visit to the correctional facility in 2018

A photo of Allan, Dolores and Steven Avery with their friend Sandy Greenman, taken during a visit to the correctional facility in 2018

Dolores maintained her son was innocent in the murder and featured prominently on the Netflix show

Dolores has maintained that her son was innocent in the murder and featured prominently on the Netflix show “Making a Murderer,” which examines Steven’s case.

She allegedly suffered from dementia and was hospitalized three weeks before her death, according to TMZ.

In a statement to the entertainment news source, Steven said, “Losing my parents before I went out has always been my worst nightmare. Now it has happened.

“I am afraid my father will not live to see me as a free man,” he said, adding: “Today I lost the person I most wanted to care for and give a better life. when I am released I cannot express the pain of losing my mother.

Steven and his nephew, Brendon Dassey, were convicted of the murder of photographer Teresa Halbach in 2005 after cops said they found his body in a home on the Avery property.

He was sentenced to life in prison without parole in 2007, while Dassey was sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole at 41 years.

Steven Avery was sentenced to life in prison without parole in 2007

Brendon Dassey was sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole in 41 years

Steven Avery and Brendon Dassey were convicted of the 2005 murder in 2007. Steven, left, was sentenced to life in prison without parole while Dassey was sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole in 41 years.

Bobby Dassey pointed to Steven Avery in the courtroom in 2007 to begin his testimony.  Now Avery's lawyer claims a new witness saw Bobby push Teresa Halbach's Toyota RAV 4 the day she was found dead

Bobby Dassey pointed to Steven Avery in the courtroom in 2007 to begin his testimony. Now Avery’s lawyer claims a new witness saw Bobby push Teresa Halbach’s Toyota RAV 4 the day she was found dead

Halbach's vehicle was found partially hidden in the Averys salvage yard and police say they found his remains in a fire pit on Averys property.

Halbach’s vehicle was found partially hidden in the Averys salvage yard and police say they found his remains in a fire pit on the Averys property.

The story was featured in the first season of “Making a Murderer,” which aired on Netflix in 2015, and cast doubt on the motives of police investigating Halbach’s death, leaving many viewers to the impression that Steven and his nephew were wrongly convicted.

The show focused on charges of police coercion and incompetence of lawyers, which critics say led to Steven’s conviction.

After it aired, more than 500,000 people signed a petition to the White House asking the president to pardon Avery, but the White House responded that “the president cannot forgive a state criminal offense.”

Avery said he had hoped to take care of his mother when he was free

Avery said he had hoped to take care of his mother when he was free

He is now awaiting a decision in his case from the Wisconsin Court of Appeal

He is now awaiting a decision in his Wisconsin Court of Appeal case

Avery's story was featured in

Avery’s story was featured in Netflix’s “Making a Murderer,” which premiered in 2015 and cast doubt on the motives of police investigating Halbach’s death.

Zellner took over his case in 2016, arguing that his rights had been violated and that detectives had gathered evidence that went beyond their search warrant, reports TMZ.

In April, she filed court documents claiming that a new witness, a delivery driver named Thomas Sowinski, saw a shirtless “Bobby Dassey”, Brendon’s brother, and an “unidentified older man” push a Toyota RAV 4 “towards the scrapyard” in the early morning of November 5, 2005.

Authorities said Halbach’s vehicle, a Toyota RAV 4, was found later that day at the Avery salvage yard.

When he heard, according to court documents, Sowinski said he recognized the importance of what he saw, but said a policewoman told him: “We already know who did it. “

Avery had previously been wrongfully convicted of sexual assault and attempted murder. He is now awaiting a decision in his case from the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.





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